handbook corporate social responisbility
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Theories of corporate social responsibility
space
Pure Marketplace Ethics Libertarian Marketplace
(Shareholder Theory)
Social Marketplace
(Shareholder Theory)
Shared Value Ethics Stakeholder Theory - Soft Progressive Corporate Social Responsibility Triple Bottom Line / Sustainability Stakeholder Theory - Hard
 
Theories of corporate social responsibility distributed across tensions
space
Profit
versus
social and
environmental engagement
Freedom versus happiness Individualism versus collectivism Independence versus belonging Dignity
versus compassion
Opportunity
versus
equality
Shareholder
versus
stakeholder
 
 
Pure Marketplace Ethics
pure market
  Overview Pure marketplace ethics aligns moral rules with economics: what's good economically is good ethically. Doing good ethically is defined as doing well economically.  
  Value Profit  
  Responsibility Gear decisions to the economic rules of the marketplace.  
  Key concepts

Good is defined as those actions that produce profit.

Social frameworks including legal codes and regulations, along with traditional social duties including the one to honesty, hold no intrinsic weight and are honored only insofar as they serve the value of profit.

Social and environmental initiatives hold no value independent of business activity and are not recognized from within business activity.

 
  Hard question What if money doesn't equal happiness?  
  Examples

The Cali Cartel (Narcotrafficking).

UBS Global Wealth Management and Business Banking (Overseas tax sheltering).

Facebook—according to the Winklevoss story: The Winklevoss twins had the idea for Facebook and paid nerdy programmer Mark Zuckerberg to do the programming. He broke his commitment to the brothers, stole the idea, wrote the program for himself and profited.

 

A manifesto

 

 
  Prime philosophical theory compatibilities Rational egoism, psychological egoism, rights theory (under some formulations)  
  Human values

Strong respect for autonomy, freedom, rights of the individual

Inherent dignity of the individual (entrepreneurship, "the self-made man/woman")

Dignity of others expressed as a refusal to pity others

Community is produced through, and is a collection of autonomous individuals

Compassion for others conditioned by their dignity

Rejection of social institutions rooted in the collective will: collective welfare enabled by opportunities for individuals

(Political value: Anarchy)

 
  Associated notable figures and businesses Meyer Lansky (gambling), Heidi Fleiss (prostitution)  
  Branding connect
What happens in Vegas...
 

E*Trade

 



Los Tucanes de Tijuana (Narcocorridos)


Kim Dotcom (Megaupload)

 

 
 
 
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